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Wild Gods

A community honoring Artemis, Pan, and Dionysus

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Hekate

Hekate’s Deipnon

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Offering to Hekate, dark of the moon, June 2018
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Wendy Rule, “Hecate”

to Hekate

Hecate I praise, fair maiden of the crossroad,
you who see things hidden, who heard Persephone
as she cried out from the underworld. Hecate,
with whose help did Demeter regain her dear child;
whose torches light the moonless night; who guards the gate;
who receives due offering wherever three roads meet;
yours, goddess, are shares in all the realms. Hecate,
who travels freely along all roads, I praise you.
To you, Hecate, are the mysteries known.
To you do women ever turn for protection.
To you do those who work magic pray for wisdom.
Hecate, ancient one, I praise and honor you.

— by Hearthstone

Full moon offering

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Io Selene, Io Artemis, Io Hekate.

Io Selene

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I was traveling over the holidays, hence the dearth of content recently. Here is the nearly-full moon over Yunnan, China the night of January 1st.

The association of Artemis with the moon depends on what period of Greek religious history you’re talking about, and also geographic region to some extent. When I first dedicated to Her my devotional activities had little to do with the moon, either in terms of visualizations or symbolism, or in terms of moon phase. But the Greek ritual month is timed according to the moon; the two major devotional activities that I do for Artemis are likewise, and one of them is in fact on the full moon. The ritual I’ve been performing lately, from Labrys’s Hellenic Polytheism: Household Worship, incorporates devotion to Selene, Artemis, and Hekate into a single ritual.

The more time I spend in the outdoors, the more attention I find myself giving the lunar cycle. At or near full, it is bright enough to see by, the brightest thing in the night sky when in the forest or mountains at night, far from sources of light pollution. When I first came to paganism, and from that to polytheism, the moon and the lunar cycle featured prominently–but many of the books I read abstracted those lunar associations from the physical satellite that I saw in the night sky.

Wild Gods is concerned with wilderness–not just a poetic or metaphorical wilderness, but the real wilderness that exists in the real world. Every month, that moon waxes and wanes over the wild, and humans are not the only ones influenced by it.

Deipnon

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(Candle: Rosarium Blends. Statue: Jeff Cullen Artistry.)

Come, graciously hear my call,
You who oversees the wide world of the night,
darkness voyaging Goddess; famed, easy-birthing, bull-faced, horned,
mother of Gods and men, Nature’s All-Mother
.

(Source: Hellenic Polytheism: Household Worship)

Image: Io Hekate

Eleusis crossed torches
Ornamental stone from the Eleusis archaeological site, 2008.

Io Hekate, Io Enodia

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Deipnon, March 28

full moon, Feb. 10

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Selene
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Artemis
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Hekate

Altars for a ritual done in the tradition of Labrys, the Greek Hellenic polytheistic community.

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